Category Archives: Daily Readings

Her-Story – A daily walk with Christian women from across the centuries

her-story

 

  • A Year’s Daily Readings

  • Lessons from Christian women of the past and present

  • Beautifully presented in hardback format

Women were an integral part of Jesus’ life and ministry as described in all four Gospels, and they are integral to the life of the church wherever Christianity has spread. In whatever position they found themselves, whether queens or slaves, they lived for their Saviour and sought to bring others to Him.

Her-Story brings together well-known names, such as Fanny Crosby and Joni Eareckson Tada, to lesser-known Christians from across the centuries in 366 devotions. The recurring theme – their love for Jesus.

Her-Story_Cloth Versions 2

Praise for Her-Story:

“Beautifully-written, a reader (woman or man!) will daily read, worship, and learn about many Christians, both well-known and lesser known. I highly recommend Diana Severance’s new book, published by Christian Focus.”

Denise George, Author, teacher, speaker www.denisegeorge.org

“Read this for new insight into church history, fresh gratitude for God’s glory in women’s lives, and strong motivation to aspire to the levels of faith, love, sacrifice, and service on display in these fascinating vignettes.”

Robert W. Yarbrough, Professor of New Testament, Covenant Theological Seminary, St. Louis, Missouri

“Arising from the stage of history with the inspiring legacy of personal faith, each woman leaps from the page to encourage and motivate all of us who read these daily devotionals penned by a church historian who knows our hearts and has tasted our trials.”

Dorothy K. Patterson, Professor of Theology in Women’s Studies, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, Forth Worth, Texas

About the Author:

Diana Lynn Severance has broad experience teaching history in universities and seminaries. She is a Director of the Dunham Bible Museum at Houston Baptist University and is the author of Feminine Threads: Women in the Tapestry of Christian History.

Where to Buy:

Her-Story: 366 Devotions from 21 Centuries of the Christian Church is available at any good Christian bookstore. If you don’t have a Christian bookstore near you, you may want to consider purchasing a copy from one of the online book retailers listed below:

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Monday Meditations: Warnings – J.C. Ryle

Monday Meditations
And the lord commended the unjust steward, because he had done wisely: for the children of this world are in their generation wiser than the children of light.
Luke 16:8

Do not draw from these verses lessons which they were never meant to teach.

The steward, whom our Lord describes, is not set before us as a pattern of morality. He is distinctly called the ‘unjust steward’. The Lord Jesus never meant to sanction dishonesty, and unfair dealing between man and man. This steward cheated his master, and broke the eighth commandment: his master was struck with his cunning and forethought, when he heard of it, and ‘commended’ him, as a shrewd and far-seeing man; but there is no proof that his master was pleased with his conduct. Above all, there is not a word to show that the man was praised by Christ. In short, in his treatment of his master the steward is a beacon to be avoided and not a pattern to be followed.

The caution now laid down is very necessary. Commercial dishonesty is unhappily very common in these latter days: fair dealing between man and man is increasingly rare: men do things in the way of business which will not stand the test of the Bible. In ‘making haste to be rich,’ thousands are continually committing actions which are not strictly innocent (Prov. 28:20).

Sharpness and smartness in bargaining, and buying and selling, and pushing trade, are often covering over things that ought not to be. The generation of ‘the unjust steward’ is still a very large one. Let us not forget this. Whenever we do to others what we would not like others to do to us, we may be sure, whatever the world may say, that we are wrong in the sight of Christ.

*Excerpted from Day By Day With J.C. Ryle: A New Daily Devotional of Ryle’s Writings by J.C. Ryle (Christian Heritage, 2011).

J.C. RyleAbout J.C. Ryle:
J. C. Ryle (1816 – 1900) was the first Bishop of Liverpool. He was one of the most authoritative churchmen of his time and his writings have been in constant demand throughout the last hundred years. His popularity was due to his clear and simple style, his longevity due to his being a profound thinker and compassionate pastor.

Where to Buy:
Day By Day With J.C. Ryle: A New Daily Devotional of Ryle’s Writings by J.C. Ryle is available at any good  Christian bookstore. If you don’t have a Christian bookstore near you, you may want to consider purchasing a copy from one of the online book retailers listed below:

Day By Day With J.C. Ryle A New daily devotional of Ryle's writings by J. C. Ryle Buy Now:

 

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Monday Meditations: The God of Hope – F. B. Meyer

Monday Meditations - Gird and Serve
‘Now the God of Hope fill you with all joy and peace in believing that ye may abound in Hope, in the power of the Holy Ghost’ (Rom. 15:13).

We all need to abound in Hope. Hope is the artist of the soul. Faith fills us with joy and peace, which brim over in Hope. When Faith brings from God’s word the materials of anticipation and expectation, Hope transfers the fair colors to her palette, and with a few deft dashes of her brush delineates the soul’s immortal and unfading hope. Faith thus excites Hope to her fairest work, until presently the walls of our soul become radiant with frescoes. Our faith rests on God’s word, and hope rests on faith, and such hope cannot be ashamed. It is the anchor of the soul, which enters that which is within the veil, and links us to the shores of eternity (Heb. 6:18, 19).

Faith rests on the promises of God. She does not calculate on feeling, is indifferent to emotion, but with both hands clings to some word of promise, and looking into God’s face, says: ‘ Thou canst not be unfaithful.’ W hen God has promised aught to thee, it is as certain as if thou hadst it in hand. Faith not only takes the word of God, and rests her weight on it, but often when hard-pressed goes beyond the Bible back to God himself, and argues that God is faithful and cannot deny himself. Because God is God, he must ever act worthily of himself.

It was thus that Moses argued when he was with him in the Holy Mount – to do thus, would not be worthy of thyself! (Num. 14:13-20). We may be assailed with a hundred questions of doubt in the day, but must no more notice them than a barking cur. A businessman once said that when he is convinced of the rightness of a certain course, he is sometimes assailed by doubts which arise like the cloud-mist of the valley, or the marsh gas from the swamp; but when thus tempted, he turns to the promises of God, often reading three or four chapters of the Old Testament. This brings him in touch with the eternal world, filling him with joy and peace and abounding hope in believing, through the power of the Holy Ghost. They shall not be ashamed that hope in him!

Prayer:
Make me, O Lord, to know the Hope of thy calling, the riches of the glory of thine inheritance in the saints, and the exceeding greatness of thy power toward them that believe. Above all, grant me the spirit of wisdom and rev- elation in the knowledge of thyself. Amen.

*Excerpted from Our Daily Walk: Daily Readings by F. B. Meyer (Christian Heritage, 2010).

F. B. MeyerAbout F. B. Meyer:
On F. B. Meyer’s death in 1929 The Daily Telegraph called him ‘The Archbishop of the Free Churches’. The New York Observer noted that ‘He has an international fame and his services are constantly sought by churches over the wide and increasing empire of Christendom.’ To the secular press of his time he was a key player on the world scene. Meyer was the minister one of Britain’s first ‘megachurches’. He was friends with D. L. Moody and ministered on both sides of the Atlantic, mirroring in America what D. L. Moody was able to undertake in the U.K. He came from a conventional, middle class Victorian background and experienced no dramatic conversion. He was not a distinguished scholar or dramatic orator. His slight figure and retiring manner meant that he did not stand out in a crowd. Yet he drew crowds by the thousands, wrote books, which sold by the millions, and attracted working class people.The range of Meyer’s activities is astonishing: preacher, pastor, writer, social activist, free church leader, Baptist president, advocate for missionary work and more. In his last years, he declared, ‘If I had a hundred lives, they should be at Christ’s disposal.’ At times, it seemed as though he was living a hundred lives!

Where to Buy:
Our Daily Walk: Daily Readings by F. B. Meyer is available at any good  Christian bookstore. If you don’t have a Christian bookstore near you, you may want to consider purchasing a copy from one of the online book retailers listed below:

Our Daily Walk by F. B. Meyer

 

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Monday Meditations: To All Eternity – Matthew Henry

Monday Meditations
“I will praise the Lord as long as I live; I will sing praises to my God while I have my being.” Psalm 146:2

If it is our delight to praise the Lord while we live, we shall certainly praise him to all eternity. With this glorious prospect be- fore us, how low do worldly pursuits seem! There is a Son of man in whom there is help, even him who is also the Son of God, who will not fail those that trust in him. But all other sons of men are like the man from whom they sprung, who, being in honor, did not abide. God has given the earth to the children of men, but there is great striving about it. Yet, after a while, no part of the earth will be their own, except that in which their dead bodies are laid. And when man returns to his earth, in that very day all his plans and designs vanish and are gone: what then comes of expectations from him? Let us take a view of the character here given of those whom God will uphold. Those shall have God for their help who take him for their God, and serve and worship him accordingly, who have their hope in him, and live a life of dependence upon him, who have good thoughts of him, and encourage themselves in him, when all other supports fail. Every believer may look upon him as the God of Jacob, of the church in general, and therefore may expect relief from him, in reference to public distresses, and as his God in particular and therefore may depend upon him in all personal wants and straits.

*Excerpted from Matthew Henry Daily Readings (Christian Heritage, 2009).

Matthew HenryAbout Matthew Henry:
Matthew Henry (1662-1714) is highly-valued by contemporary preachers and Bible users. He was the son of a Puritan pastor who had been silenced by the government of the time. Although it was difficult to find suitable ministerial training, Matthew Henry eventually studied for the ministry. With government opposition relaxing, he became a Presbyterian pastor in Chester in 1687 and later in London from 1712. It is astonishing to note the amount of preaching and writing that he accomplished despite suffering from ill-health and knowing intense sorrow in his family life.

Where to Buy:
Matthew Henry Daily Readings by Randall J. Pederson (editor) is available at any good  Christian bookstore. If you don’t have a Christian bookstore near you, you may want to consider purchasing a copy from one of the online book retailers listed below:

Matthew Henry (Daily Readings) Buy Now:

 

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Monday Meditations: Without Money – Samuel Rutherford

Monday Meditations - Daily Readings: The Puritans

“Ho, every one that thirsteth, come ye to the waters, and he that hath no money; come ye, buy, and eat; yea, come, buy wine and milk without money and without price.” Isaiah 55:1

Notions of justification without faith (as with the Antinomians) cast loose the covenant, “I will be your God.” But here there is a condition—God is not bound and we free; therefore, this is the other part, “and ye shall be my people.” Now, it is taught by libertines, that there can be no closing with Christ, in a promise that has a qualification or condition expressed; and that conditional promises are legal. It is true, if the word “condition” be taken in a wrong sense, the promises are not conditional. For, Arminians take a condition for a free act, which we absolutely may perform or not perform by free will, not acted by the pre-determinating grace of Christ; so jurists take the word: but this makes men lords of heaven and hell, and puts the keys of life and death over to absolute contingency. Conditions have a Popish sense, for doing that which, by some merit, moves God to give to men wages for work, and so, promises are not conditional: but libertines deny all conditions. But taking condition, for any qualification wrought in us by the power of the saving grace of God; Christ promises soul-ease, but upon a condition, which His grace works, that the soul be sin-sick for Christ; and He offers “wine and milk” (Isa. 55:1); “And the water of life freely,” (Rev. 22:17) upon condition that you buy without money: no purse is Christ’s grace-market, no hire and sense of wretchedness is a hire for Christ.

Samuel Rutherford

Samuel Rutherford

About Samuel Rutherford:
Samuel Rutherford (1600-1661) was a Church of Scotland minister, theologian, controversialist, devotional writer, and political theorist. He was one of the Scottish commissioners to the Westminster Assembly, and was a prominent defender of mainstream orthodoxy. He was active in the Presbyterian and Covenanter cause. Rutherford’s posthumous reputation rests chiefly on his Letters, which were first published in Holland in 1664, and quickly became a classic of evangelical Protestant piety. Both Richard Baxter and Charles Spurgeon praised the Letters, and they were republished no fewer than eighty times in English. This month’s readings are from Rutherford’s Trial and Triumph of Faith (1645), a collection of sermons on the healing of the Canaan woman’s daughter (Matt. 15:21-28).

*Excerpted from Daily Readings – The Puritans (Christian Heritage, 2012).

Where to Buy:
Daily Readings – The Puritans by Randall Pederson (editor) is available at any good  Christian bookstore. If you don’t have a Christian bookstore near you, you may want to consider purchasing a copy from one of the online book retailers listed below:

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Monday Meditations: Sorrow and Grief – George Whitefield

Monday Meditations - George Whitefield

“How long must I take counsel in my soul and have sorrow in my heart all the day?” Psalm 13:2

Our sorrow and grief for sin must not spring merely from a fear of wrath. For if we have no other ground but that it proceeds from self-love, and not from any love for God. And if love for God is not the chief motive in your repentance, your repentance is in vain and not to be esteemed true. Many, in our days, think their crying to God is repentance, and that God will forgive them as such; but indeed, they are mistaken; it is not the drawing near to God with our lips, while our hearts are far from him, which he regards. Repentance does not come by fits and starts; no, it is one continued act of our lives; for as we daily commit sin, so we need a daily repentance before God to obtain forgiveness for those sins we commit. It is not your confessing yourselves to be sinners, it is not knowing your condition to be sad and deplorable, so long as you continue in your sins; your care and endeavors should be, to get the heart thoroughly affected therewith, that you may feel yourselves to be lost and undone creatures. Christ came to save such as are lost; and if you are enabled to groan under the weight and burden of your sins, then Christ will ease you and give you rest. And until you are thus sensible of your misery and lost condition, you are a servant to sin and to your lusts, under the bondage and command of Satan, doing his drudgery: you are under the curse of God and liable to judgment. Consider how dreadful your state will be at death, and after the Day of Judgment, when you will be exposed to such miseries which the ear has not heard, neither can the heart conceive, and that to all eternity, if you die impenitent.

*Excerpted from George Whitefield Daily Readings (Christian Heritage, 2010).

Where to Buy:
George Whitefield Daily Readings by Randall J. Pederson (editor) is available at any good  Christian bookstore. If you don’t have a Christian bookstore near you, you may want to consider purchasing a copy from one of the online book retailers listed below:

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Monday Meditations: He arose, and did eat and drink, and went in the strength of that meat forty days and forty nights – Spurgeon

Monday Meditations Spurgeon
‘He arose, and did eat and drink, and went in the strength of that meat forty days and forty nights’ 1 Kings 19:8

All the strength supplied to us by our gracious God is meant for service, not for wantonness or boasting. When the prophet Elijah found the cake baked on the coals, and the cruse of water placed at his head, as he lay under the juniper tree, he was no gentleman to be gratified with dainty fare that he might stretch himself at his ease; far otherwise, he was commissioned to go forty days and forty nights in the strength of it, journeying towards Horeb, the mount of God. When the Master invited the disciples to ‘Come and dine’ with Him, after the feast was concluded He said to Peter, ‘Feed my sheep’; further adding, ‘Follow me’. Even thus it is with us; we eat the bread of heaven, that we may expend our strength in the Master’s service. We come to the Passover, and eat of the paschal lamb with loins girt and staff in hand, so as to start off at once when we have satisfied our hunger. Some Christians are for living on Christ, but are not so anxious to live for Christ. Earth should be a preparation for heaven; and heaven is the place where saints feast most and work most. They sit down at the table of our Lord, and they serve Him day and night in His temple. They eat of heavenly food and render perfect service. Believer, in the strength you daily gain from Christ labour for Him. Some of us have yet to learn much concerning the design of our Lord in giving us His grace. We are not to retain the precious grains of truth as the Egyptian mummy held the wheat for ages, without giving it an opportunity to grow: we must sow it and water it. Why does the Lord send down the rain upon the thirsty earth, and give the genial sunshine? Is it not that these may all help the fruits of the earth to yield food for man? Even so the Lord feeds and refreshes our souls that we may afterwards use our renewed strength in the promotion of His glory.

*Excerpted from Morning and Evening: Daily Readings by C. H. Spurgeon (Christian Heritage, 2009).

Where to Buy:
Morning and Evening: Daily Readings by C. H. Spurgeon is available at any good  Christian bookstore. If you don’t have a Christian bookstore near you, you may want to consider purchasing a copy from one of the online book retailers listed below:

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Monday Meditations: Sin – Luke 8:43 – J. C. Ryle

Monday Meditations
And a woman having an issue of blood twelve years, which had spent all her living upon physicians, neither could be healed of any…
Luke 8:43

A striking picture of the condition of many souls.

We are told that she had been afflicted with a wearing disease for ‘twelve years’, and that she ‘had spent all her living upon physicians’, and that she could not be ‘healed of any’. The state of many a sinner’s heart is placed before us in this description, as in a glass. Perhaps it describes ourselves.

There are men and women in most congregations who have felt their sins deeply, and been sore afflicted by the thought that they are not forgiven and not fit to die. They have desired relief and peace of conscience, but have not known where to find them. They have tried many false remedies, and found themselves ‘nothing bettered, but rather worse’. They have gone the round of all the forms of religion, and wearied themselves with every imaginable man-made device for obtaining spiritual health. But all has been in vain. Peace of conscience seems as far off as ever. The wound within appears a fretting, intractable sore, which nothing can heal. They are still wretched, still unhappy, still thoroughly discontented with their own state. In short, like the woman of whom we read today, they are ready to say, ‘ There is no hope for me. I shall never be saved’.

Let all such take comfort in the miracle which we are now considering. Let them know that ‘there is balm in Gilead’, which can cure them, if they will only seek it. There is one door at which they have never knocked in all their efforts to obtain relief. There is one Physician to whom they have not applied, who never fails to heal. Let them consider the conduct of the woman before us in her necessity. When all other means had failed she went to Jesus for help. Let them go and do likewise.

*Excerpted from Day By Day With J.C. Ryle: A New Daily Devotional of Ryle’s Writings by J.C. Ryle (Christian Heritage, 2011).

J.C. RyleAbout J.C. Ryle:
J. C. Ryle (1816 – 1900) was the first Bishop of Liverpool. He was one of the most authoritative churchmen of his time and his writings have been in constant demand throughout the last hundred years. His popularity was due to his clear and simple style, his longevity due to his being a profound thinker and compassionate pastor.

Where to Buy:
Day By Day With J.C. Ryle: A New Daily Devotional of Ryle’s Writings by J.C. Ryle is available at any good  Christian bookstore. If you don’t have a Christian bookstore near you, you may want to consider purchasing a copy from one of the online book retailers listed below:

Day By Day With J.C. Ryle A New daily devotional of Ryle's writings by J. C. Ryle Buy Now:

 

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Monday Meditations – Love’s Compulsion – F. B. Meyer

Monday Meditations - Gird and Serve

‘Go out into the high- ways and hedges, and compel them to come in, that my house may be filled’ (Luke 14:23).

We can never estimate the yearning love of God for the souls of men. He sees us absorbed with farming and industry; business and pleasure; with our homes and family life, and knows that these will all pass away, as a dream before the first touch of eternity. With intense passion he desires that we shall be really satisfied with abiding joys.

The Feast that he spreads is abundant and ready (Isa. 25:7; 55:1, 2). A banquet is a happy-making time. As the guests sit together, there is the brilliant flow of conversation, the sparkle of laughter, the enjoyment of the good things provided, the interchange of friendship and fellowship. Everything that a feast stands for God is waiting to give us. ‘He gives us richly all things to enjoy.’ How strange it is that men, mocked by the Evil One, are cajoled into forfeiting their places at the banqueting table, which God has spread for them!

The Jewish people were first bidden, but they were too much occupied with material things to respond to the gracious invitation. The excuses offered were shallow and stupid; the real reason lies much deeper, in the disinclination of the soul to arouse itself to lay hold of the life which is life indeed! But God’s purpose of love cannot be defeated (Luke 13:28-30; Acts 13:45-48).

‘Go out into the highways and hedges.’ Here is our work as his servants! The high-roads, along which the streams of commerce and pleasure, weddings and funerals, statesmen and businessmen, young men and women, housewives and children – are constantly passing! The hedgerows are the quiet sequestered lanes of the countryside, now covered with spring flowers, and again with autumn tints. The up-to-date motor car, or the slow-jogging country wagon are symbols of different modes of life, but the souls that use them alike need the message of Good News. Let us go forth and constrain them to come in that our Master’s House may be filled!

Prayer:
Blessed Lord, have mercy upon those who reject the invitation of thy love! Take from us all ignorance, hardness of heart and contempt of thy word; and so fetch us home, dear Lord, to thy flock, that we may be saved, and become one flock under the Great Shepherd of souls. Amen.

*Excerpted from Our Daily Walk: Daily Readings by F. B. Meyer (Christian Heritage, 2010).

F. B. MeyerAbout F. B. Meyer:
On F. B. Meyer’s death in 1929 The Daily Telegraph called him ‘The Archbishop of the Free Churches’. The New York Observer noted that ‘He has an international fame and his services are constantly sought by churches over the wide and increasing empire of Christendom.’ To the secular press of his time he was a key player on the world scene. Meyer was the minister one of Britain’s first ‘megachurches’. He was friends with D. L. Moody and ministered on both sides of the Atlantic, mirroring in America what D. L. Moody was able to undertake in the U.K. He came from a conventional, middle class Victorian background and experienced no dramatic conversion. He was not a distinguished scholar or dramatic orator. His slight figure and retiring manner meant that he did not stand out in a crowd. Yet he drew crowds by the thousands, wrote books, which sold by the millions, and attracted working class people.The range of Meyer’s activities is astonishing: preacher, pastor, writer, social activist, free church leader, Baptist president, advocate for missionary work and more. In his last years, he declared, ‘If I had a hundred lives, they should be at Christ’s disposal.’ At times, it seemed as though he was living a hundred lives!

Where to Buy:
Our Daily Walk: Daily Readings by F. B. Meyer is available at any good  Christian bookstore. If you don’t have a Christian bookstore near you, you may want to consider purchasing a copy from one of the online book retailers listed below:

Our Daily Walk by F. B. Meyer

 

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Monday Meditations: To Live to Praise – Matthew Henry

Monday Meditations
“Sing praises to the Lord, O you his saints, and give thanks to his holy name.” Psalm 30:4

When things are well with us, we are very apt to think that they will always be so. When we see our mistake, it becomes us to think with shame upon our carnal security as our folly. If God hide his face, a good man is troubled, though no other calamity befalls him. But if God, in wisdom and justice, turn from us, it will be the greatest folly if we turn from him. No; let us learn to pray in the dark. The sanctified spirit, which returns to God, shall praise him, shall be still praising him; but the services of God’s house cannot be performed by the dust; it cannot praise him; there is none of that device or working in the grave, for it is the land of silence. We ask aright for life, when we do so that we may live to praise him. In due time God delivered the psalmist out of his troubles. Our tongue is our glory, and never more so than when employed in praising God. He would persevere to the end in praise, hoping that he should shortly be where this would be the everlasting work. But let all beware of carnal security. Neither outward prosperity, nor inward peace, here, are sure and lasting. The Lord, in his favor, has fixed the believer’s safety firm as the deep-rooted mountains, but he must expect to meet with temptations and afflictions. When we grow careless, we fall into sin, the Lord hides his face, our comforts droop, and troubles assail us.

*Excerpted from Matthew Henry Daily Readings (Christian Heritage, 2009).

Matthew HenryAbout Matthew Henry:
Matthew Henry (1662-1714) is highly-valued by contemporary preachers and Bible users. He was the son of a Puritan pastor who had been silenced by the government of the time. Although it was difficult to find suitable ministerial training, Matthew Henry eventually studied for the ministry. With government opposition relaxing, he became a Presbyterian pastor in Chester in 1687 and later in London from 1712. It is astonishing to note the amount of preaching and writing that he accomplished despite suffering from ill-health and knowing intense sorrow in his family life.

Where to Buy:
Matthew Henry Daily Readings by Randall J. Pederson (editor) is available at any good  Christian bookstore. If you don’t have a Christian bookstore near you, you may want to consider purchasing a copy from one of the online book retailers listed below:

Matthew Henry (Daily Readings) Buy Now:

 

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Filed under Christian Heritage, Daily Readings, Matthew Henry, Monday Meditations