Tag Archives: F. B. Meyer

Monday Meditations: The God of Hope – F. B. Meyer

Monday Meditations - Gird and Serve
‘Now the God of Hope fill you with all joy and peace in believing that ye may abound in Hope, in the power of the Holy Ghost’ (Rom. 15:13).

We all need to abound in Hope. Hope is the artist of the soul. Faith fills us with joy and peace, which brim over in Hope. When Faith brings from God’s word the materials of anticipation and expectation, Hope transfers the fair colors to her palette, and with a few deft dashes of her brush delineates the soul’s immortal and unfading hope. Faith thus excites Hope to her fairest work, until presently the walls of our soul become radiant with frescoes. Our faith rests on God’s word, and hope rests on faith, and such hope cannot be ashamed. It is the anchor of the soul, which enters that which is within the veil, and links us to the shores of eternity (Heb. 6:18, 19).

Faith rests on the promises of God. She does not calculate on feeling, is indifferent to emotion, but with both hands clings to some word of promise, and looking into God’s face, says: ‘ Thou canst not be unfaithful.’ W hen God has promised aught to thee, it is as certain as if thou hadst it in hand. Faith not only takes the word of God, and rests her weight on it, but often when hard-pressed goes beyond the Bible back to God himself, and argues that God is faithful and cannot deny himself. Because God is God, he must ever act worthily of himself.

It was thus that Moses argued when he was with him in the Holy Mount – to do thus, would not be worthy of thyself! (Num. 14:13-20). We may be assailed with a hundred questions of doubt in the day, but must no more notice them than a barking cur. A businessman once said that when he is convinced of the rightness of a certain course, he is sometimes assailed by doubts which arise like the cloud-mist of the valley, or the marsh gas from the swamp; but when thus tempted, he turns to the promises of God, often reading three or four chapters of the Old Testament. This brings him in touch with the eternal world, filling him with joy and peace and abounding hope in believing, through the power of the Holy Ghost. They shall not be ashamed that hope in him!

Prayer:
Make me, O Lord, to know the Hope of thy calling, the riches of the glory of thine inheritance in the saints, and the exceeding greatness of thy power toward them that believe. Above all, grant me the spirit of wisdom and rev- elation in the knowledge of thyself. Amen.

*Excerpted from Our Daily Walk: Daily Readings by F. B. Meyer (Christian Heritage, 2010).

F. B. MeyerAbout F. B. Meyer:
On F. B. Meyer’s death in 1929 The Daily Telegraph called him ‘The Archbishop of the Free Churches’. The New York Observer noted that ‘He has an international fame and his services are constantly sought by churches over the wide and increasing empire of Christendom.’ To the secular press of his time he was a key player on the world scene. Meyer was the minister one of Britain’s first ‘megachurches’. He was friends with D. L. Moody and ministered on both sides of the Atlantic, mirroring in America what D. L. Moody was able to undertake in the U.K. He came from a conventional, middle class Victorian background and experienced no dramatic conversion. He was not a distinguished scholar or dramatic orator. His slight figure and retiring manner meant that he did not stand out in a crowd. Yet he drew crowds by the thousands, wrote books, which sold by the millions, and attracted working class people.The range of Meyer’s activities is astonishing: preacher, pastor, writer, social activist, free church leader, Baptist president, advocate for missionary work and more. In his last years, he declared, ‘If I had a hundred lives, they should be at Christ’s disposal.’ At times, it seemed as though he was living a hundred lives!

Where to Buy:
Our Daily Walk: Daily Readings by F. B. Meyer is available at any good  Christian bookstore. If you don’t have a Christian bookstore near you, you may want to consider purchasing a copy from one of the online book retailers listed below:

Our Daily Walk by F. B. Meyer

 

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Monday Meditations – Love’s Compulsion – F. B. Meyer

Monday Meditations - Gird and Serve

‘Go out into the high- ways and hedges, and compel them to come in, that my house may be filled’ (Luke 14:23).

We can never estimate the yearning love of God for the souls of men. He sees us absorbed with farming and industry; business and pleasure; with our homes and family life, and knows that these will all pass away, as a dream before the first touch of eternity. With intense passion he desires that we shall be really satisfied with abiding joys.

The Feast that he spreads is abundant and ready (Isa. 25:7; 55:1, 2). A banquet is a happy-making time. As the guests sit together, there is the brilliant flow of conversation, the sparkle of laughter, the enjoyment of the good things provided, the interchange of friendship and fellowship. Everything that a feast stands for God is waiting to give us. ‘He gives us richly all things to enjoy.’ How strange it is that men, mocked by the Evil One, are cajoled into forfeiting their places at the banqueting table, which God has spread for them!

The Jewish people were first bidden, but they were too much occupied with material things to respond to the gracious invitation. The excuses offered were shallow and stupid; the real reason lies much deeper, in the disinclination of the soul to arouse itself to lay hold of the life which is life indeed! But God’s purpose of love cannot be defeated (Luke 13:28-30; Acts 13:45-48).

‘Go out into the highways and hedges.’ Here is our work as his servants! The high-roads, along which the streams of commerce and pleasure, weddings and funerals, statesmen and businessmen, young men and women, housewives and children – are constantly passing! The hedgerows are the quiet sequestered lanes of the countryside, now covered with spring flowers, and again with autumn tints. The up-to-date motor car, or the slow-jogging country wagon are symbols of different modes of life, but the souls that use them alike need the message of Good News. Let us go forth and constrain them to come in that our Master’s House may be filled!

Prayer:
Blessed Lord, have mercy upon those who reject the invitation of thy love! Take from us all ignorance, hardness of heart and contempt of thy word; and so fetch us home, dear Lord, to thy flock, that we may be saved, and become one flock under the Great Shepherd of souls. Amen.

*Excerpted from Our Daily Walk: Daily Readings by F. B. Meyer (Christian Heritage, 2010).

F. B. MeyerAbout F. B. Meyer:
On F. B. Meyer’s death in 1929 The Daily Telegraph called him ‘The Archbishop of the Free Churches’. The New York Observer noted that ‘He has an international fame and his services are constantly sought by churches over the wide and increasing empire of Christendom.’ To the secular press of his time he was a key player on the world scene. Meyer was the minister one of Britain’s first ‘megachurches’. He was friends with D. L. Moody and ministered on both sides of the Atlantic, mirroring in America what D. L. Moody was able to undertake in the U.K. He came from a conventional, middle class Victorian background and experienced no dramatic conversion. He was not a distinguished scholar or dramatic orator. His slight figure and retiring manner meant that he did not stand out in a crowd. Yet he drew crowds by the thousands, wrote books, which sold by the millions, and attracted working class people.The range of Meyer’s activities is astonishing: preacher, pastor, writer, social activist, free church leader, Baptist president, advocate for missionary work and more. In his last years, he declared, ‘If I had a hundred lives, they should be at Christ’s disposal.’ At times, it seemed as though he was living a hundred lives!

Where to Buy:
Our Daily Walk: Daily Readings by F. B. Meyer is available at any good  Christian bookstore. If you don’t have a Christian bookstore near you, you may want to consider purchasing a copy from one of the online book retailers listed below:

Our Daily Walk by F. B. Meyer

 

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Monday Meditations: God’s Challenge to Man

Monday Meditations - Gird and Serve

God’s Challenge to Man

‘I heard the voice of the Lord, saying, Whom shall I send, and who will go for us? Then said I, Here am I; send me’(Isa. 6:8).

From the midst of heaven there comes to our earth this cry for help – an appeal from the Eternal Trinity: ‘Who will go for us!’ It reminds us of the last commission of our Lord to his disciples, that they should go into all the world, and preach his gospel to every creature. The Seraphim may minister to those who have become the heirs of salvation, but only those who have been redeemed from among men have the high privilege of being called to the supreme work of redemption.

Notice the preparation for responding to that ap- peal. The vision of the Eternal: ‘I saw the Lord sitting upon a throne’. Suddenly the material temple, in which Isaiah was probably worshipping, gave place to the eternal; the altar and the laver to the throne of God; the cloud of incense, to the skirts of glory that filled the air; the choir of Levites, to the bands of the Seraphim that engirdled the sapphire throne. And above all, he beheld the glory of Christ (John 12:41).

This led to the vision of his own heart: ‘Woe is me, for I am undone’. It is when a man reaches the snowline that he realizes the comparative impurity of the whitest white that earth can produce. Probably there was no one in all Jerusalem who lived nearer to God than Isaiah; but when he learned that, in the estimation of the Seraphim, God was thrice holy; when he saw them veil their faces in adoration; when he discovered that the whole universe was filled with God; then he remembered the hidden evil of his own heart, and cried out, ‘I am unclean!’ Not a moment intervened between his confession and the cleansing of his iniquity, and he was able to say, ‘Send me!’

Have you heard that cry for help from the heart of Christ? Are you seeking to enter into his yearning love for the souls of men? He says to each one of us: ‘Could ye not watch with me one hour?’ Give yourself to him that you may be used in his service: ‘Here am I, send me, use me’.

Prayer:
Lord, grant us ears to hear, eyes to see, wills to obey, hearts to love; then declare what thou wilt, reveal what thou wilt, command what thou wilt, demand what thou wilt. Amen.

*Excerpted from Our Daily Walk: Daily Readings by F. B. Meyer (Christian Heritage, 2010).

F. B. MeyerAbout F. B. Meyer:
On F. B. Meyer’s death in 1929 The Daily Telegraph called him ‘The Archbishop of the Free Churches’. The New York Observer noted that ‘He has an international fame and his services are constantly sought by churches over the wide and increasing empire of Christendom.’ To the secular press of his time he was a key player on the world scene. Meyer was the minister one of Britain’s first ‘megachurches’. He was friends with D. L. Moody and ministered on both sides of the Atlantic, mirroring in America what D. L. Moody was able to undertake in the U.K. He came from a conventional, middle class Victorian background and experienced no dramatic conversion. He was not a distinguished scholar or dramatic orator. His slight figure and retiring manner meant that he did not stand out in a crowd. Yet he drew crowds by the thousands, wrote books, which sold by the millions, and attracted working class people.The range of Meyer’s activities is astonishing: preacher, pastor, writer, social activist, free church leader, Baptist president, advocate for missionary work and more. In his last years, he declared, ‘If I had a hundred lives, they should be at Christ’s disposal.’ At times, it seemed as though he was living a hundred lives!

Where to Buy:
Our Daily Walk: Daily Readings by F. B. Meyer is available at any good  Christian bookstore. If you don’t have a Christian bookstore near you, you may want to consider purchasing a copy from one of the online book retailers listed below:

Our Daily Walk by F. B. Meyer

 

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Monday Meditations: The Power of Christ’s Resurrection

Monday Meditations - Gird and Serve
The Power of Christ’s Resurrection

‘Like as Christ was raised up from the dead by the glory of the Father, even so we also should walk in newness of life’ (Rom. 6:4).

The keynote of this inspiring paragraph is life in union with the risen Christ. Behind us lies the death of our Lord, which severed for his people their fellowship with the world. As the voice of praise or blame cannot reach the dead, but are arrested at the fast-closed ears, so it is intended that the murmur of the world should not affect us, but that we should be set only on the will of God.

It is not wise, however, to dwell always on the negations of the Christian life. It is true that they are always present, but to dwell on them is to miss the power by which self-sacrifice and self-denial become easy. Do not live on the dying but on the risen side of the Saviour’s work. Behold him as he goes forth upon his upward way to the throne of glory. Seek to experience union with him in the likeness of his resurrection (Phil. 3:10).

There ought to be a finality in our experience. It is good for us to recognize the break with our past life. It must be clearly defined; we must have done with it for ever. It is possible that we may be tempted, and come temporarily beneath the dominion of old sins; but in principle, like the Israelites, we have passed from Egypt, never to return to it, and the Red Sea of Christ’s redemption severs us from our former condition. We do not reckon ourselves to be dead to sin in the sense that our nature is henceforth incapable of sinning. If we think thus, we shall soon be disillusioned, and find that tendencies and strivings are within us which prove the contrary. But we must reckon that we have died to sin, and whenever temptation comes, that it has no claim upon us. Nelson turned his blind eye to the signal to retreat from action, and we are to turn blind eyes and deaf ears to the tempter.

The apostle says that we are to present our members as instruments of righteousness to God. Do not look at the tempter, but at Christ; yield the eyes, ears, heart and mind to him, that he may make the best possible use of them; and that which becomes the habitual practice of the outward life will inevitably affect the soul and spirit.

Prayer:
Constrained by thy love, O Lord, we would here present ourselves, spirit, soul and body, not to live unto ourselves, but unto thee who didst die and rise again. Amen.

*Excerpted from Our Daily Walk: Daily Readings by F. B. Meyer (Christian Heritage, 2010).

F. B. MeyerAbout F. B. Meyer:
On F. B. Meyer’s death in 1929 The Daily Telegraph called him ‘The Archbishop of the Free Churches’. The New York Observer noted that ‘He has an international fame and his services are constantly sought by churches over the wide and increasing empire of Christendom.’ To the secular press of his time he was a key player on the world scene. Meyer was the minister one of Britain’s first ‘megachurches’. He was friends with D. L. Moody and ministered on both sides of the Atlantic, mirroring in America what D. L. Moody was able to undertake in the U.K. He came from a conventional, middle class Victorian background and experienced no dramatic conversion. He was not a distinguished scholar or dramatic orator. His slight figure and retiring manner meant that he did not stand out in a crowd. Yet he drew crowds by the thousands, wrote books, which sold by the millions, and attracted working class people.The range of Meyer’s activities is astonishing: preacher, pastor, writer, social activist, free church leader, Baptist president, advocate for missionary work and more. In his last years, he declared, ‘If I had a hundred lives, they should be at Christ’s disposal.’ At times, it seemed as though he was living a hundred lives!

Where to Buy:
Our Daily Walk: Daily Readings by F. B. Meyer is available at any good  Christian bookstore. If you don’t have a Christian bookstore near you, you may want to consider purchasing a copy from one of the online book retailers listed below:

Our Daily Walk by F. B. Meyer

 

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Filed under Christian Heritage, Daily Readings, Monday Meditations

Monday Meditations: Praising the Lord

Monday Meditations - Gird and Serve
Praising the Lord

‘Praise ye the Lord; for it is good to sing praises unto our God’ (Ps. 147:1).

It is a comely and befitting thing for us to blend praise and prayer. There is a difference between praise and thanksgiving. We thank God for what he has done for us; we praise him for what he is in himself. In praise we come nearest to the worship of Heaven, where the angels and the redeemed find the loftiest exercise of their faculties in ascribing praise, and honour, and glory to God. In my private devotions, I find nothing more helpful than to recite the Te Deum before asking for any gift at the hand of God. It seems to put God in his right place, and to bow the soul before him in the attitude of adoration and praise. ‘It is good to sing praises, and praise is comely.’

Let us praise his condescending love (vv. 1-6). He counts the number of the stars as a shepherd tells his sheep. The Psalmist likens the constellations to a flock of sheep, which their shepherd is driving through space. What a sublime conception of suns, planets and asteroids! Yet this wonderful and infinite God can bend over our little lives, and take special notice of the outcasts, the broken- hearted, the sorely wounded and the meek. None are too small and insignificant for his notice. Just as a mother is most careful and thoughtful for the smallest and most ailing child in her family, so God’s tenderest, strongest and most efficient help is displayed towards the neediest and most helpless of his children. He always seeks the lost sheep and the prodigal child.

Let us praise God’s work in providence. Notice the present tenses in this Psalm.The Psalmist felt that God was always working in nature, and that everything was due to the direct action of his Providence. And Jesus confirmed this when he said that no sparrow fell to the ground without the Father’s notice. The pure in heart, the child-like and the meek, have this prerogative of seeing God’s hand in all things. God is; God is everywhere active and energetic; and therefore there is no point of space, and no moment of time, in which he does not operate. ‘Let us offer the sacrifice of praise to God continually, that is, the fruit of our lips, giving thanks to his Name’ (Heb. 13:15).

Prayer:
We beseech thee, give us that due sense of all thy mercies, that our hearts may be unfeign- edly thankful, and that we shew forth thy praise, not only with our lips, but in our lives, by giv- ing up ourselves to thy service, and by walking before thee in holiness and righteousness all our days; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

*Excerpted from Our Daily Walk: Daily Readings by F. B. Meyer (Christian Heritage, 2010).

F. B. MeyerAbout F. B. Meyer:
On F. B. Meyer’s death in 1929 The Daily Telegraph called him ‘The Archbishop of the Free Churches’. The New York Observer noted that ‘He has an international fame and his services are constantly sought by churches over the wide and increasing empire of Christendom.’ To the secular press of his time he was a key player on the world scene. Meyer was the minister one of Britain’s first ‘megachurches’. He was friends with D. L. Moody and ministered on both sides of the Atlantic, mirroring in America what D. L. Moody was able to undertake in the U.K. He came from a conventional, middle class Victorian background and experienced no dramatic conversion. He was not a distinguished scholar or dramatic orator. His slight figure and retiring manner meant that he did not stand out in a crowd. Yet he drew crowds by the thousands, wrote books, which sold by the millions, and attracted working class people.The range of Meyer’s activities is astonishing: preacher, pastor, writer, social activist, free church leader, Baptist president, advocate for missionary work and more. In his last years, he declared, ‘If I had a hundred lives, they should be at Christ’s disposal.’ At times, it seemed as though he was living a hundred lives!

Where to Buy:
Our Daily Walk: Daily Readings by F. B. Meyer is available at any good  Christian bookstore. If you don’t have a Christian bookstore near you, you may want to consider purchasing a copy from one of the online book retailers listed below:

Our Daily Walk by F. B. Meyer

 

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Monday Meditations: The Indwelling Spirit

Monday Meditations - Gird and Serve

The Indwelling Spirit

‘I will pray the Father, and he shall give you another Comforter, that he may abide with you for ever’ (John 14:16).

The gift of the Holy Spirit was due to the intercession of our Lord, and St Peter refers to it when he says: ‘Having received of the Father the promise of the Holy Spirit’ (Acts 2:33). In 1 John 2:1 (RV) the word Comforter is translated Advocate – ‘One who makes us strong by his presence, as Helper, Guide and Instructor.’ Think what this means, to have always beside us, not a vague influence, but a divine Person, who waits to be our strength in weakness, our peace in trouble, our wisdom in perplexity, our conqueror in temptations, our consoler in sorrow. The Lord meant that the Holy Spirit should be to us all that he himself had been. This is the meaning of Another. There are two Advocates, or Paracletes. When the one ascended to the glory, the other descended into the hearts of his disciples. ‘He abideth with you, and shall be in you.’

‘I will not leave you comfortless: I will come to you.’ Christ had been speaking of sending Another; now he says, I am coming myself, so that we learn that he is so indissolubly one with the Holy Spirit, whom he sends, that the coming of the Spirit is his own coming. Do not look for the Spirit apart from Jesus. As the sun comes in the light, so does Jesus come in the Spirit. When we are filled with the Spirit, we shall not think of him, but of Jesus to whom he bears witness; and when our hearts are taken up with the Lord, we may know that we have received him, who is the Gift of gifts.

Open your whole nature to the entrance of the Holy Spirit. Unlock every door, uncurtain every window, that entering he may fill you with the glorious indwelling of the Father and the Son. ‘I will prepare a mansion,’ Jesus said; and, ‘We will make the holy soul Our Mansion.’

‘He shall teach you all things.’ His lesson-book is the life and words of our blessed Lord. We may think that we are fully informed of all that he has said, but as we study the Bible, the Holy Spirit brings us back to them again and again, always revealing new light, and undreamt of depths. Never let a day pass without reading some of the words of Jesus under the guidance of the Holy Spirit.

Prayer: Thou hast not left us comfortless, O God. May life be renewed in its springs, by the gracious operation of thy Holy Spirit dwelling within us, and leading us from grace to grace. Amen.

*Excerpted from Our Daily Walk: Daily Readings by F. B. Meyer (Christian Heritage, 2010).

Where to Buy:
Our Daily Walk: Daily Readings by F. B. Meyer is available at any good  Christian bookstore. If you don’t have a Christian bookstore near you, you may want to consider purchasing a copy from one of the online book retailers listed below:

Our Daily Walk by F. B. Meyer

 

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Monday Meditations: Where there’s a Will there’s a Way!

Monday Meditations - Gird and Serve

Where there’s a Will there’s a Way!

‘And when they could not find by what way they might bring him in because of the multitude, they went upon the housetop, and let
him down through the tiling, with his couch, into the midst before Jesus’ (Luke 5:19).

What a lovely human story this is! The crowds that gathered around our Lord, as he taught them, were so great that they filled not only the house where he was staying, with the Pharisees and learned men sitting by, but overflowed into a vast multitude in the forecourt. The Master may have stood on the balcony of a double-storied house, so as to be able to reach the crowds within and without.

As he was teaching, presently four men approached, carrying on a hammock slung between them a paralyzed man. We are not told in so many words that they were young men, but their earnestness and ingenuity incline one to this idea. Perhaps they had been school-chums together, and as they grew up they may have entered upon evil ways – ‘sown their wild oats’ together, and one of their number may have been suffering from the consequences, for our Lord very distinctly set the pardon of his sins before the healing of his body. His four companions had probably heard Christ preach and had become his followers, for it was seeing their faith that he performed this miracle of salvation and healing. They agreed that by hook or by crook they would bring their friend into Christ’s gracious presence. Unable to make their way through the throng, they were not daunted, but climbed up on to the roof, and the record says, ‘let him down through the tiling’. Lowered by strong hands, with its four ropes, the hammock swung to the feet of the Master, and the expectant imploring eyes of this poor fellow could not make a more eloquent appeal for help than did the evident faith of his bearers.

The words with which our Lord saluted him were very tender and gracious: ‘Man, thy sins are forgiven thee!’ One of the sure means of physical health is to be assured of spiritual cleansing and forgiveness (James 5:14-16). Would that we were all equally anxious to bring our friends to Christ. If four would agree about a fifth, and never rest until he or she was brought to Jesus, what a revival would break out (John 4:28-30).

Prayer:
Enlarge our souls with a divine love, that we may hope all things, endure all things and become messengers of thy healing mercy to the grievances and infirmities of men. Amen.

*Excerpted from Our Daily Walk: Daily Readings by F. B. Meyer (Christian Heritage, 2010).

Where to Buy:
Our Daily Walk: Daily Readings by F. B. Meyer is available at any good  Christian bookstore. If you don’t have a Christian bookstore near you, you may want to consider purchasing a copy from one of the online book retailers listed below:

Our Daily Walk by F. B. Meyer

 

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Monday Meditations: The Devotional Use of Scripture

Monday Meditations - Gird and Serve

The Devotional Use of Scripture

‘Thy word is a lamp unto my feet, and a light unto my path’ (Ps. 119:105).

In each verse of Psalm 119, the Psalmist mentions the Scriptures, with one exception, and the constant quo-tation of the Old Testament by our Lord and his apostles yields abundant evidence of loving and reverent fellowship with the holy men of past ages, who wrote and spoke as moved by the Holy Spirit. It is specially remarkable that the Lord Jesus in his Temptation, in all his teaching, and in the agony of the Cross bore constant witness to the unique authority of the word of God spoken through the Old Testament saints.

We may know God, says the Psalmist, through a threefold revelation. Though they have no audible voice or language, the heavens declare the glory of God, and the firmament of space, studded with myriads of stars, shows his handiwork. Though speechless, their words witness for him to the uttermost parts of the earth.

The closing stanza of this great Psalm unfolds God’s handiwork in the construction and direction of our moral nature. Between these golden clasps the Psalmist extols the Scriptures under ten striking similitudes, and that disposition must be indeed extraordinary that does not come within the scope of one of them. The soul that needs restoring; the simple who would become wise; the sad heart who would rejoice; the eyes that would be enlightened; the soul that longs for the gold of truth; the desire for sincerity and reality; the search for understand-ing and righteousness – all such needs and many more are met from a devout reading of Holy Scripture.

All great ministries which have remained fresh and fragrant through long courses of years have proved the wealth of inexhaustible teaching and inspiration which lies hidden in the Bible. Let us each one resolve to soak ourselves in the Scripture before turning to prayer, as water poured in to moisten the sucker will help to draw water up.

Prayer:
Teach us, O blessed Spirit of Inspiration, so to read, mark, learn and inwardly digest thy words, that we may be thoroughly furnished unto all good works, and be enabled to lead others into a true understanding of and love for its hidden treasures. Amen.

*Excerpted from Our Daily Walk: Daily Readings by F. B. Meyer (Christian Heritage, 2010).

Where to Buy:
Our Daily Walk: Daily Readings by F. B. Meyer is available at any good  Christian bookstore. If you don’t have a Christian bookstore near you, you may want to consider purchasing a copy from one of the online book retailers listed below:

Our Daily Walk by F. B. Meyer

 

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Monday Meditations: Love Triumphant over Death

Monday Meditations - Gird and Serve

Love Triumphant over Death

It was not possible, said St Peter, that our Lord should be holden of death (Acts 2:24). It behoved Christ to suffer; but all the bitter waters of suffering could not quench his love. He was the propitiation for the sins of the whole world. Therefore, every man, even those who pierced him, is included in his great love.

Christ died, not only to put away sin by the sacrifice of himself, but to rob death of its terrors, and deprive it of its sting. In death our Lord Jesus destroyed both the Devil and his power; the prince of this world has been judged and cast out of the seat of power (Heb. 2:14, 15; John 12: 31; 16:11).

Let us not be afraid of the mystery of death. Christ has shown us that it is the gateway into another life. There is the same spirit, but a different environment. It is a condi- tion of existence in which the same voices are heard; the same human fellowship persists. During the forty days in which Jesus tarried on our earth after his Resurrection, he solved many of the problems of life after death, and illuminated its mystery. To die is to be with him, and to be welcomed into the great company of loving spirits (2 Pet. 1:11).

Let us not fear the loneliness of death. The soul passing through the dark valley becomes aware of Another by its side – ‘Thou art with me’. Death cannot separate us, even for a moment, from the love of God, which is in Christ Jesus our Lord. Jesus died alone; he felt forsaken; but none of us need pass through that terrible experience, for he has said, ‘I will come again, and receive you unto myself.’

We need not fear what comes after death. The curse and penalty of sin have been put away for ever. ‘Who is he that condemneth? It is Christ that died, yea, rather, that is risen again.’ That which others call death, we dread no more than sleep. Our bodies lie down exhausted with our long working-day, to awake in the fresh energy of the Eternal Morning, while our spirit is presented before the Presence of his Glory, faultless, and with exceeding joy (Jude 24).

Prayer:
O God, may we so trust thee this day, that, when the day is done, our trust shall be firmer than ever. Then, when our last day comes, and our work is done, may we trust thee in death and forever, in the spirit of Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

*Excerpted from Our Daily Walk: Daily Readings by F. B. Meyer (Christian Heritage, 2010).

Where to Buy:
Our Daily Walk: Daily Readings by F. B. Meyer is available at any good  Christian bookstore. If you don’t have a Christian bookstore near you, you may want to consider purchasing a copy from one of the online book retailers listed below:

Our Daily Walk by F. B. Meyer

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Monday Meditations: A Changed Occupation

Monday Meditations - Gird and Serve

A Changed Occupation

‘He went forth, and beheld a publican, named Levi, sitting at the place of toll, and said unto him, Follow me. And he forsook all, and rose up and followed him’ (Luke 5:27, 28).

The trade between the Orient and the vast populations on the Mediterranean, passed through the Lake of Gali- lee, making a highly profitable trade for Capernaum, and the smaller cities and towns. The custom-house in which this man Levi held a lucrative position was probably quite near the lake, which was much frequented by our Lord, and thus he may have had opportunities of listening to his teaching. On the other hand, it is possible that the Saviour’s summons to him was absolutely unexpected, though it elicited an instant response, for he rose up, left all and followed Jesus. No doubt he returned later to make up his books, and hand in the balance that may have been in his charge.

Our Lord called him ‘Matthew’ – which means ‘a gift’. He was a great addition to the band of disciples, and the gift of his Gospel to the church has made the whole world his debtor. Matthew conceals, with beautiful modesty, the fact that he prepared a great feast for the Master, which was perhaps partly to signalize his adherence to his new calling, and partly as an opportunity to introduce his new-found friend to the publicans and sinners – i.e. the excommunicated persons of the city (vv. 29, 30). That feast may have been the first step to the foundation of the Christian church. Our Lord gladly availed himself of the opportunity to declare his purpose to seek and save the lost, to create a new society on that principle and to make possible the enclosure of these lost sheep with the flock.

If Zacchaeus happened to be in the party that day, it is likely that for him it was the inauguration of a new life, and as he sat there under the fascination of Christ, he resolved to make reparation to any whom he had cheated and over-charged!

Let us see to it that there is more joy in our religious life. Let us seek the people who think themselves for ever excommunicated from the church. It may be that we shall find Matthew, or Augustine, or John Bunyan among them!

Prayer:
O God, wherever thou leadest we would go, for thy ways are perfect wisdom and love. Blend our wills with thine, and then we need fear no evil nor death itself, for all things must work together for our good. Amen.

*Excerpted from Our Daily Walk: Daily Readings by F. B. Meyer (Christian Heritage, 2010).

Where to Buy:
Our Daily Walk: Daily Readings by F. B. Meyer is available at any good  Christian bookstore. If you don’t have a Christian bookstore near you, you may want to consider purchasing a copy from one of the online book retailers listed below:

Our Daily Walk by F. B. Meyer

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