Tag Archives: preaching

Multiplying Churches

The following extract is taken from Multiplying Churches, new and updated from Christian Focus Publications. Written from Acts 29’s years of experience, Multiplying Churches unpacks how church plants can be used not only to reach people with the Gospel, but to encourage an entire church family to be actively involved in doing so. This serves as a timely reminder that mission needs to be our identity rather than our event.

Contributors include: Matt Chandler, Steve Timmis and Tim Chester.


9781781913246

Motive: Grace-filled church planting

MATT CHANDLER

Church planting is becoming trendy. There was a time when it was what the weirdos did on the fringes of evangelicalism. It was the province of misfits and malcontents who wanted to do something different. But increasingly church planting is becoming mainstream. Now the church-planting world is populated by cool dudes. In many ways this is a hugely encouraging development. But it comes with certain dangers. Church planting has become a way to make a name or build a kingdom for yourself.

WHAT ARE YOUR MOTIVES?

What is it that drives us? What is the anchor for the church planter and his team? It is the gospel. For all other motivations will fail you. The difficulty of the work, the sinfulness of your own heart, the desire to be applauded and the longing to be seen as a success are all powerful forces. They will chisel away at us. We may start finding our worth by how many people show up each Sunday. We may begin to expect a type of entitlement that God considers offensive rather than the humility that understands that we are the servants of all.

So a key question you need to process in your own heart is this: What are your motives? Whether you are investigating church planting or already moving towards planting or an existing church that wants to get into planting, you need to ask what it is that is really driving that desire. We need to wrestle when we see things that are inconsistent with a gospel motivation. We must confess and repent of them.

This will require a type of humility among the leaders of leaders that I have found to be rare. For it is in our weaknesses that the gospel is often seen most clearly.

Some time ago I received an unhelpful, negative email. I knew the Bible says I should respond with gentleness. So I typed up a kind and gracious response, and then copied in the elders of my church. Later Brian Miller, our lead pastor and chairman of our elder board, came to my office and said: ‘I’m so proud of you, Matt. I think that type of godliness is rare. I so appreciate it.’ In that moment I could have puffed up and thanked him. I could have pretended that I had sought the Lord in prayer and felt that what this brother needed was compassion. But that would have made me a liar. It would have represented a false kind of strength that is built on me and not Christ. So instead, by the grace of God, I took the opportunity to confess my sinful attitudes. Together Brian and I prayed for heart change. It was an opportunity for me to build my foundation again on Christ instead of trying to build it on me. We must get over ourselves! As John the Baptist said: ‘He must increase, but I must decrease’ (John 3:30).

You need to do the work of evaluating the motives of your heart for they will spring up often and surprise you. Do not be surprised by your surprise. Be willing and diligent to do the hard work of confession and repentance. You are not above it. When Luther said that all of life is repentance he meant that there will be an on-going discipline in your life of confession and repentance. It means there will never be a day for you when you are not in need of saying, ‘Oh, I have done it again. Help me, Lord.’

And if you can anchor your heart in the gospel, then if it takes you thirty years to grow a church of three people you might walk in holy discontent, but you will not walk in sinful discontent. I think we are going to be surprised in heaven at who is well rewarded and who is not. That is because the Lord sees the heart. He knows our faithfulness. He does not celebrate bigness over smallness. He is the God who said: ‘Gideon, if I let you beat that army you’re going to get big-headed. So I’m going to cut down your army.’ ‘It’s still too big. Cut it down further. You need to know it’s just me who wins the battle.’ This seems to be the habit of the Lord – paring down and then working for the glory of His name.

So may your motives be as pure as possible. And may you be quick to repent when they are not.


“From the heights of biblical theology, to the plains of who does what, these brief chapters are again and again both practical and wise.”

Mark Dever, Capitol Hill Baptist Church and President, 9Marks.org, Washington, DC

“Fifteen years ago, the church planting movement was in its infancy. Today, many things have been learned but new challenges lie ahead. Therefore I am glad for the new edition of this book, in which those early lessons can be reviewed and the new horizons faced.”

Tim Keller, Redeemer Presbyterian Church, New York City


Where to Buy:
Multiplying Churches: Exploring God’s Mission Strategy is available at any good Christian bookstore. If you don’t have a Christian bookstore near you, you may want to consider purchasing a copy from one of the online book retailers listed below:

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Why You Need to Preach the Song of Songs – Dr. Jim Hamilton

hamilton-header
Dr. Hamilton serves as Professor of Biblical Theology at SBTS and as Preaching Pastor at Kenwood Baptist Church in Louisville, KY. He’s also the author of the new book, Song of Songs: A Biblical-Theological, Allegorical, Christological Interpretation. Connect with Dr. Hamilton online at jimhamilton.info.

Song of Songs by Jim HamiltonThe smut is everywhere. On billboards, on TV screens, and eye-level in the checkout line at the grocery store, to say nothing of what is one click away on the device in your pocket or the screen on your desk. Beyond the superficial temptation of all the eye-catchers, the smut comes with a story. These sirens aren’t just singing an isolated hypnotizing song, they are selling a vision of the good life, appealing to your ideas about what pleasure is, about how you can have it now, and trying to convince you there won’t be a reckoning later. As though no one has ever foundered on the rocks trying to get to that shore.

These advertisements—from the billboards to the commercials to the mannequins—are all presenting themselves as icons that symbolize a wider story. They whisper in your ear: this is who you can be. This is how you can live. This is what you can look like. This is who you can have. And this life will satisfy all your longings.

But will it?

And if we’re convinced that there are longings deeper than the ones they’re stroking, how do we counter the intrusive message that saturates our surroundings? How do we convince other people that what they’re seeing is the harlot Babylon posing with that girl next door look? Can we woo them with something better, something that will entice them away from the lust that looses disaster?

Can I suggest to you that this is exactly why the Song of Songs is in the Bible?

What if there was something so beautiful it could break the spell of all that eye-candy? What if there was something so satisfying it would empower us to hear the siren song for what it is—an invitation to ruin and misery with the smoke of your destruction going up forever and ever?

Would God be so good to us that he would give us a book that could describe the lost intimacy of Eden? Not only describing it: holding it out as a possibility, offering it to us, inviting us to partake, inspiring us to imitate.

The Song of Songs, Solomon’s most sublime Song, is no more an isolated statement than those Viagra commercials are. The Song of Songs has to be read in the context of the story of the whole Bible.

That story starts with a couple in a garden, naked and without shame, in perfect harmony and bliss. Sin ruins their safety and shatters their intimacy, and they hide themselves from God and one another. God searches them out, and he promises a redeemer who will defeat the one who tempted them to sin. That redeemer’s line of descent is carefully traced, and eventually God promises that a descendant of David will rise up to redeem. When the prophets speak of what life will be like when he comes, it sounds like things will be better than they were in Eden before sin.

When God put that couple in the Garden in the beginning, he gave them to each other in marriage. Then when God made a covenant with the nation of Israel, he spoke of the relationship as a though it were a marriage. The unfaithfulness of Israel to the Lord was illustrated in the book of Hosea. The Lord commanded Hosea to marry a prostitute, and faithful Hosea stood for the Lord himself, while his wife’s promiscuity and unfaithfulness stood for Israel’s spiritual adultery.

The book of Hosea communicates the failure of the covenant between the Lord and Israel, leading to the “divorce” of the exile of the people from the land. There are plenty of indications in Hosea, however, that the Lord intends to make a new marital covenant with his people, after he has disciplined them for their sin (see esp. Hos 2:16–23).

If the book of Hosea presents a failed marriage, the Song of Songs presents a poetic success. The Song of Solomon depicts an idealized Solomon, scion of David, king in Jerusalem, who overcomes every barrier to intimacy between himself and his bride. This picture provides the wider backdrop that explains the way that carpenter’s kid from Nazareth came hailed as “the bridegroom.”

Once that Galilean had shown himself to be the long awaited Redeemer, the apostle Paul explained in Ephesians 5 that marriage exists so that the world will understand the relationship between him and his people: the new covenant between Christ and his Bride, the church. Then in Revelation 19 we read that the great celebration of his conquering kingdom is going to be a marriage feast.

The good life isn’t the lie of a non-stop, no-consequence orgy with the whore of Babylon. The good life is a permanent, exclusive, comprehensive union of one man and one woman in procreative marriage. In such marriages, husband and wife follow in the footsteps of the one who has made it so that the gates to the Garden of Eden stand open to those who keep his word.

Whatever those billboards say, your life is not about your looks and your identity and your pleasure. Your life is about God, in whose image you were made, and every marriage —including yours—is about Jesus and the church.

The Song of Songs is one movement in the Bible’s grand symphony. Heard in the context of the whole orchestral production, its movements, harmonies, and developments will ravish and purify, enrich and sanctify, deepen and delight. We need to listen closely. You need to preach it. So the Bride will be pure.

This article originally appeared at LifeWayPastors.com.

Where to Buy:
Song of Songs is available at any good Christian bookstore. If you don’t have a Christian bookstore near you, you may want to consider purchasing a copy from one of the online book retailers listed below:

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Preaching With Spiritual Power by Ralph Cunnington

Preaching With Spiritual PowerThe nature of the relationship between the Spirit of God and the Word of God has been debated among believers for centuries. Is the Spirit present wherever and whenever the Word is preached?

Ralph Cunnington explores this and in particular the narrow historical theological question of what the Protestant Reformers, in particular John Calvin, actually taught on this topic. With careful and
incisive scholarship, and writing that is both clear and cogent, we travel through this question.

Look inside:

Praise For Preaching With Spiritual Power:

“… the first book-length treatment of an important issue that has been simmering just under the surface of British Evangelicalism for a number of years… I hope this will not lead to a full-blown controversy, but to a closer examination of the Scriptures.”
-Sinclair B. Ferguson, Associate Preacher, St Peter’s Free Church, Dundee, Scotland

“… stimulating, challenging and timely. It is of great importance that our doctrine of preaching is robust and biblical and I found this volume’s careful assessment of Calvin a great help in achieving these aims.”
-Adrian Reynolds, Director of Ministry, The Proclamation Trust

Ralph CunningtonAbout Ralph Cunnington:
Ralph Cunnington is co-pastor of City Church Manchester. He is a member of the Theological Teams of FIEC and Affinity and editor of Affinity’s theological journal Foundations.

Connect with Ralph:

Where to Buy:
Preaching With Spiritual Power is available at any good Christian bookstore. If you don’t have a Christian bookstore near you, you may want to consider purchasing a copy from one of the online book retailers listed below:

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New from Mentor: Unashamed Workmen: How Expositors Prepare and Preach by Rhett Dodson (Editor)

Unashamed WorkmenUnashamed Workman brings together some of the finest preachers of our day,  focusing on the methods they use to prepare their sermons. You will find a variety of approaches and styles but they all share a passion for the Word of God to be explained and applied clearly.

Contributors include:

  • Peter Adam
  • Rhett Dodson
  • Iain Duguid
  • Ajith Fernando
  • David Jackman
  • Simon Manchester
  • David Meredith
  • Josh Moody
  • Douglas Sean O’Donnell
  • Richard D. Phillips.

Praise for Unashamed Workmen:

“…a tour of the workshops of talented preachers, enabling us to look over the shoulders of these master craftsmen of proclaimed truth in order to learn how we might produce messages reflecting the beauty and utility of their sermons.”
-Bryan Chapell, Pastor, Grace Presbyterian Church, Peoria, Illinois

“This is a great book. It brings together diverse and complementary voices from experienced expository preachers who are thoroughly committed to the Gospel. It is not a textbook. Its strength and freshness depend on the sweep of voices.”
-D. A. Carson, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, Deerfield, Illinois

“…remarkably helpful and practical. Prepare to be inspired, challenged, and exhorted.”
-Jason Helopoulos, Assistant Pastor, University Reformed Church, East Lansing, Michigan

Rhett DodsonAbout Rhett Dodson:
Rhett Dodson is pastor of Grace Presbyterian Church, Hudson, Ohio.

Where to Buy:
Unashamed Workmen: How Expositors Prepare and Preach by Rhett Dodson (Editor) is available at any good  Christian bookstore. If you don’t have a Christian bookstore near you, you may want to consider purchasing a copy from one of the online book retailers listed below:

Unashamed Workmen  Buy Now:

 

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Radio Inteview: Alec Motyer – The Janet Mefferd Show

Alec MotyerChristian Focus author Alec Motyer was interviewed on The Janet Mefferd Show this past Wednesday (01/29/2014) to discuss his book Preaching?: Simple Teaching on Simply Teaching. You can listen to the archive of this broadcast here:  LINK.

About the Book:
Like many things in life, the skill of good preaching is 95% perspiration and 5% inspiration. At its basic level he tells us that preparing a good sermon is like baking a cake. It requires the correct ingredients for each type of cake to be baked, likewise with preaching, know your subject and pull all the pieces together to make up the winning recipe. Preaching is a privilege accorded to few and the fruits thereof welcomed by many—let Alec Motyer help you reach out and make the best of the gifts God has given you.

About the Author:
Dr Alec Motyer is a well-known Bible expositor and from an early age has had a love for studying God’s Word. He was formerly principal of Trinity College, Bristol.

Other Books by Alec Motyer:
Isaiah By the Day:  A New Devotional Translation by Alec Motyer Life 2: The Sequel by Alec MotyerRoots: Let the Old Testament Speak by Alec motyer

Where to Buy:
Preaching? Simple Teaching on Simply Preaching by Alec Motyer is available at any good  Christian bookstore. If you don’t have a Christian bookstore near you, you may want to consider purchasing a copy from one of the online book retailers listed below:

Preaching? Simple Teaching on Simply Preaching by Alec Motyer Buy Now:

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Preaching?: Simple Teaching on Simply Preaching Blog Tour

Preaching? Simple Teaching on Simply Preaching by Alec MotyerThis week we have a number of reviewers participating in a book review blog tour for Preaching?: Simple Teaching on Simply Preaching by Alec Motyer. Excerpts from their reviews follow below:

“I commend this work.  It will be helpful for pastors seeking to honor God in the preaching event.  It will assist lay leaders in understanding the importance of the preaching text.  And, for all, it will help us marvel at the grace that’s give by our great God in communicating through the medium of His Word.”
Reviewer: Phil Auxier (philauxier.com)
Rating: 5 Stars

“what was most helpful was restoring the idea that preaching is hard work, real work, and rewarding work.  In fact, I’d say it’s very rare to have a book that gives us both the street-level blue collar feel of preaching combined with a call to personal worship along the way.  These two things make the book worthy of attention:  The work of preaching and the worship of preaching.”
Reviewer: Brian Mann (catherinelakebaptist.com)
Rating: 4 Stars

“It stays true to its intent by practicing what it preaches:  Simplicity and focus of thought. That focus of thought is on the Gospel of Jesus Christ.”
Reviewer: Andrew Pierson (souljournaler.blogspot.com)
Rating: 5 Stars

“I warmly commend this book to preachers, especially young preachers with little experience. Motyer illustrates his approach by giving several examples of how to exegete a passage and turn it into a sermon.  By opening up his process to new preachers, Motyer gives them a gift. Those who follow his method will be brought into an encounter with the Spirit in the text. May all who declare God’s Word do so with such loving attention!”
Reviewer: James Matichuk (thoughtsprayersandsongs.com)
Rating: 5 Stars

“Motyer is basically guiding readers through how to develop better sermon prep skills on the study side of things so that they can create a snowball effect over the course of their ministry… If you want to avoid the anxiety that comes with last minute sermon prep, Motyer has some simple advice that will work wonders for your ability to prepare well for preaching.”
Reviewer: Nate Claiborne (nathanielclaiborne.com)
Rating: 4 Stars

“When a very able and competent Old Testament scholar puts his hand at the plough of preaching, my attention stands up… I encourage all who preach or who are in preparation to be preachers to take a look at this book.  You will be refreshed and challenged as you examine its contents.”
Reviewer: Spencer Cummins (spencerdeancummins.blogspot.com)
Rating: 4 Stars

“tried and true advice grounded in biblical truth that will be an asset to the preaching community for generations to come.”
Reviewer: Joshua Davis (ServantsOfGrace.org)
Rating: 4 Stars

“This book is a great way to expand on what an aspiring minister has already learned in seminary. He states that we have a two fold responsibility, first to the truth and second to the congregation. This is an excellent example of sermon writing at its finest.”
Reviewer: Jalynn Patterson (asimplelifereally.blogspot.com)
Rating: 5 Stars

“This simple but engaging book is practical theology at its best, a book rooted in the Word, exalting the Gospel and relying on the Holy Spirit to assist the preacher or teacher as they prepare and preach the Word. I recommend this book for both young and seasoned preachers, especially those who are preparing in seminary to preach the Word of God.”
Reviewer: Dave Jenkins (ServantsOfGrace.org)
Rating: 5 Stars

“In “Preaching? Simple Teaching for Simply Preaching,” J. Alec Motyer has given us a wonderful little book, not only for preachers, but for anyone who loves God’s Word. This book stands out for its readability and Scripture-centered approach… This is one of those books I would like to read again at a slower pace, pausing each time Motyer unpacks a passage and reading through the related Scripture while referencing his comments. Among books on preaching, it is one of the easiest and most enjoyable to read. I happily recommend it to anyone who loves to proclaim God’s Word.”
Reviewer: Steve Brand (gegraptai.com)
Rating: 5 Stars

“Quite simply, this is a great book, even a wonderful book. Somehow in very few pages Motyer manages to provide instructions and examples on understanding the text, organizing ones thoughts, presentation, the preacher’s devotional life, pastoral care, prayer – it is not easy to think of an area of preaching that he does not address… Five stars. If I could I’d give it six!”
Reviewer: Alan Davey (daveys2france.blogspot.fr)
Rating: 5 Stars

“I’ve got quite a large collection of books on preaching, and I try to read something on the subject on a regular basis, at least once a year. Alec Motyer’s book will stand as one of my favorites. It is quick and fun to read. The author covers all the areas of preaching from choosing and studying the text to delivery. He also talks about the preacher himself.”
Reviewer: Emmanuel Durand (erdurand.com)
Rating: 5 Stars

Preaching is exactly as the subtitle states, a book that has simple teaching on simply preaching. Motyer does not break new ground on the nature and practice of preaching. What he does is give us a good reminder of the preachers responsibility as a minister of the Word of God. This is a great primer on preaching for preachers young and old.”
Reviewer: Craig Hurst (craighurst.wordpress.com)
Rating: 4 Stars

“If you’re looking for a new approach to preaching, give Preaching? a try. If you’re a young preacher still developing your style, give Preaching? a try. But most of all, if you want to learn how to study the Scriptures better, whether you’re a preacher or not, give Preaching? a try.”
Reviewer: Dave Marrandette (eyeonchristianity.blogspot.com)
Rating: 3 Stars

“I would highly recommend this to anyone who teaches or preaches on a regular basis. Motyer provides a helpful pattern to follow to help those who preach and teach be faithful in their exposition of God’s Word and helpful to the hearers.”
Reviewer: Joey Parker (parkerjreviews.blogspot.com)
Rating: 5 Stars

“It is a wealth of information that would be helpful to any student of the Bible, however, even more so for ordinary people like me.”
Reviewer: Angela Parsley (refreshmysoulblog.blogspot.com)
Rating: 4 Stars

“I have the privilege of owning and having read most of the well known volumes on preaching and this book is worthy of taking its place beside them to me. Five stars all the way!
Reviewer: Jimmy Reagan (reaganreview.wordpress.com)
Rating: 5 Stars

Where to Buy:
Preaching? Simple Teaching on Simply Preaching by Alec Motyer is available at any good  Christian bookstore. If you don’t have a Christian bookstore near you, you may want to consider purchasing a copy from one of the online book retailers listed below:

Preaching? Simple Teaching on Simply Preaching by Alec Motyer Buy Now:

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Preaching?: Simple Teaching on Simply Preaching – A Review By Rhett Dodson

Preaching? Simple Teaching on Simply Preaching by Alec Motyer

In this primer, veteran Bible scholar and preacher Alec Motyer offers his insights and wisdom garnered from a lifetime of preaching. Many will know Motyer from his commentary on Isaiah and will find here a very personal work with reminiscence and reflection. For those not familiar with this influential preacher, Preaching? will provide a good introduction.

Motyer opens with a confession that when he first began to preach he really didn’t know how to go about his duty. In the first chapter, entitled “Between You and Me” he writes, “Looking back, it took me a surprisingly long time to learn that sermons are not spontaneous or extended intuitions but things to be worked at, and it took even longer to discover how to go about it” (p. 8). The following thirteen chapters then outline his way of preparation and the spiritual life that is necessary for a godly ministry.

Chapters 2 through 5 contain a philosophy of preaching, if you will. Motyer shares with the reader just what the job of preaching entails and why it is so important. Following this overview of the task, the next 5 chapters present the basics of sermon preparation, which involve examination, analysis, orientation, what Motyer calls “harvesting”, and presentation. Throughout these chapters the author not only gives instruction but offers numerous examples of what he has in mind. Drawn from a wealth of sermonic material, these illustrations provide the reader with a clear way to see the theory put into practice. The final four chapters stress application, the preacher’s own walk with God, and the necessity of preaching Christ, “the tenderest word of all”. Following the body of the book, the author has included 10 appendices. Each of these contains a series of brief devotional thoughts gathered around a central theme or passage of Scripture. Here the reader will find helpful material for his own spiritual life and perhaps kindling for a series of messages.

Preaching? offers the young preacher a warm and heartening chat from an older and wiser brother–mentor. The conversational tone makes for easy reading, and those just beginning the task of preaching will find encouragement to work hard, instruction on how to go about the work, and a challenge to maintain a close walk with God.

Rhett DodsonAbout the Reviewer:
Rhett Dodson is the pastor of Grace Presbyterian Church (PCA) in Hudson, Ohio. He previously served as an associate pastor and seminary professor. Originally from Pickens, South Carolina, Rhett has a PhD in Old Testament. He and his wife Theresa, live in Hudson.

Be on the lookout for Rhett’s new book The Unashamed Workman: How Expositors Prepare and Preach in July 2014

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Recommended Review: Preaching? Simple Teaching on Simply Preaching

Preaching? Simple Teaching on Simply Preaching by Alec MotyerMany thanks to James Matichuk (thoughtsprayersandsongs.com) for his 5-star review of Preaching? Simple Teaching on Simply Preaching by Alec Motyer. James’ review is featured in its entirety below:

When the opportunity to review a new preaching book by Alec Motyer presented itself, I jumped at the chance.  A competent biblical scholar, Motyer has written several commentaries that I have on my shelf (both in paper format and electronic). Notably, his commentaries on Isaiah is essential to anyone who wishes to gain a greater grasp on Isaiah’s prophecy. He is  the general editor of the Old Testament for the Bible Speaks Today commentary series (published by IVP) and has contributed several volumes to the series. He is also former principal of  Trinity College, Bristol.

In Preaching? Simple Teaching on Simply Preaching, Motyer details his approach to expository preaching. He shares wisdom from years of practice with plenty of examples of how to take a text and turn it into a sermon. This is not a ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach to preaching. Motyer writes, “For preaching is a very personal and individual exercise. We can learn from each other, but must not copy each other. It won’t work! Like criminals we must each discover our own modus operandi – find out what is our own brand of murder – and, hopefully, get away with it!” (Kindle Locations 306-308).  Without heavy-handedly describing ‘the’ plan for preaching, Motyer shares his advice and insight on how to do it well. As a scholar, pastor, expositor, and preacher with decades of faithful service, he has a lot to say.

Motyer’s method is simple (as his subtitle suggests). He tells us to find a text: examine it, analyze it, orient ourselves to it, and harvest from it.  The wisdom of his approach is that it forces the preacher to sit under a text rather than use a passage to illustrate their own agenda (or what they think the church ‘needs to hear’). Literary structure, inclusio, word studies and repetitions reveal meaning in the text. Often attention to the broad contours of the passage reveals an apt word for our context. This is what Motyer suggests: study and understand the text, prayerfully submit yourself to the text and pay attention to what God is saying there. When you have done that, you can craft a sermon (harvesting). And yes, he does offer advice on presentation and delivery: what to do and not do, and what to do but not too much. He does have some good words to say about how to draw out applications from a passage.

These are all important points and I agree a wholeheartedly with most of what Motyer commends. I have minor disagreements with him in places because as Motyer observes, preaching is a highly personal endeavor.  But I have still failed to mention what I think are the most significant insights that Motyer imparts.   I appreciated Motyer’s passion for the importance of preaching. Unfolding God’s Word and declaring it to the church gathered is sacred work. Beginning in his early chapters, but throughout this volume, Motyer describes this joyful and serious task and the demands it makes of the would-be-preacher. To preach and preach well is to give attention to the Word and to the church. While Motyer devotes much of this book describing attention to the Word (where we hear the voice of God), to preach well is also to fulfill our pastoral vocation: to pray for the congregation, and be involved in their lives. As Motyer observes, “Our position as ministers in a church gives us the right to preach, but it does not give us the right to be heard”(Kindle Locations 1503-1504).  A pastor who is actively caring for the flock and prayerfully attending to their spiritual formation will preach with power.

I warmly commend this book to preachers, especially young preachers with little experience. Motyer illustrates his approach by giving several examples of how to exegete a passage and turn it into a sermon.  By opening up his process to new preachers, Motyer gives them a gift. Those who follow his method will be brought into an encounter with the Spirit in the text. May all who declare God’s Word do so with such loving attention! I give this book 5 stars.

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Preaching? Simple Teaching on Simply Preaching by Alec Motyer

Preaching? Simple Teaching on Simply Preaching by Alec MotyerLike many things in life, the skill of good preaching is 95% perspiration and 5% inspiration. At its basic level he tells us that preparing a good sermon is like baking a cake. It requires the correct ingredients for each type of cake to be baked, likewise with preaching, know your subject and pull all the pieces together to make up the winning recipe. Preaching is a privilege accorded to few and the fruits thereof welcomed by many—let Alec Motyer help you reach out and make the best of the gifts God has given you.

Table of Contents:
1. Between You and Me
2. Work to be done: the Pursuit
3. The Heart of the Matter
4. Faithful Teachers
5. ‘This Came Out’
6. Getting to know you: Examination
7. Rightly Dividing: Analysis
8. Finding the Pole Star: Orientation
9. Gather Ye Rosebuds: Harvesting
10. The Window and the Cake: Presentation
11. So what? Application
12. Behind the Scenes: Spirituality
13. The Last Lap
14. The Tenderest Word of All

Click here to read a sample chapter: PDF

Alec MotyerAbout the Author:
Dr Alec Motyer is a well-known Bible expositor and from an early age has had a love for studying God’s Word. He was formerly principal of Trinity College, Bristol.

Praise For Preaching? Simple Teaching on Simply Preaching:

“Alec Motyer has had a profound, formative influence on my preaching. In this book he puts his decades of wisdom on expository preaching at the reader’s fingertips. This is as practical and Biblically solid a book on preaching as you can find today.”
-Tim Keller ~ Senior Pastor, Redeemer Presbyterian Church, New York City, New York

“Alec Motyer once said of Allan Harman’s commentary on Isaiah, ‘His work has made me wish wholeheartedly that I could start all over again.’ And Alec’s succinct and stirring treatise on preaching makes me wish wholeheartedly that I could start all over again-in that blessed privilege of preaching, praying and pastoring.”
-Dale Ralph Davis, author and Bible expositor

Where to Buy:
Preaching? Simple Teaching on Simply Preaching by Alec Motyer is available at any good  Christian bookstore. If you don’t have a Christian bookstore near you, you may want to consider purchasing a copy from one of the online book retailers listed below:

Preaching? Simple Teaching on Simply Preaching by Alec Motyer Buy Now:

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Backlist Title — The People’s Theologian: Writings in Honour of Donald Macleod

Scottish evangelical leader, churchman and scholar, Donald Macleod has had a far-reaching influence. The People’s Theologian: Writings in Honour of Donald Macleod honors this great man and at the same time offers important contributions on topics close to Macleod’s heart: historical and systematic theology, biblical interpretation, and preaching.

Alex J. MacDonald (minister of Buccleuch & Greyfriars Free Church of Scotland, Edinburgh) in this books’ introduction describes some of the lasting contributions of Macleod’s life and ministry:

“Donald’s guiding star has been and remains, “What says the Scripture?” …There is no tradition or practice that cannot be re-examined in the light of Scripture. He has constantly reminded us of the great Reformation principle – our authority is “Scripture Alone.”

“…like his Master, the common people hear him gladly. Donald Macleod makes little concession in his lecturing or preaching to ignorance of Biblical or theological truth, and he makes no apology for Biblical and theological language. Nevertheless, because he makes doctrine come alive, people are drawn in, people of all different backgrounds….

“Donald Macleod is the people’s theologian…. He combines a profound grasp of the language of Scripture and the history of Christian doctrine with a penetrating understanding of the dilemmas of life at the beginning of the third millennium. Through it all shines his adoration of Jesus Christ and his deep sympathy with people. He never loses sight for a moment that he is addressing people – people who are hurting, or confused or ill-informed or tempted. This is theology straight from the heart of a great preacher of the gospel.”

The book is edited by Ian D. Campbell and Malcom Maclean and includes contributions from: Martin Cameron, Mary Ferguson, Richard B. Gaffin Jr., David George, Michael W. Honeycutt, Fergus MacDonald, Alex J. MacDonald, Donald M. MacDonald, Alasdair I. Macleod, Donna Macleod, John Macleod, David Meredith, Guy Richard, Changwon Shu, Derek W. H. Thomas, Carl R. Trueman, Rowland S. Ward and Brian Wilson.

Learn more about the book, and preview its table of contents at ChristianFocus.com. You can pick up a copy of this book from one of the following online retailers: Westminster Books, ChristianBook.com, Amazon.com, BarnesandNoble.com, or 10ofThose.com.

Selected Christian Focus Titles from Donald Macleod:

For a full list of Christian Focus titles by Donald Macleod, click here.

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